HE IS TALLER THAN ME CORRECT THE SENTENCE

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    2022-11-29T00:38:27+05:30

    HE IS TALLER THAN ME CORRECT THE SENTENCE

    It’s a common mistake to say “he is taller than me” when you really mean “he is taller than I.” While both phrases are technically correct, the former is more commonly used in spoken English while the latter is more appropriate in written English.

    What is the proper way to use adjectives and adverbs?

    When it comes to adjectives and adverbs, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, adjectives describe, identify and quantify people or things and usually go in front of a noun. They don’t change if the noun is plural. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs and usually come after the verb. For example:

    He’s a slow driver. (adjective)
    He drives slowly. (adverb)
    Most adverbs are created by adding -ly to an adjective, as seen in the example above. When using more than one adjective before a noun, you generally put them in this order: quantity or number, quality or opinion, size, age, shape, color/pattern, origin/material. For example:

    We ate a huge plate of greasy food.
    When it comes to adverbs of frequency (which tell you how often something happens), there are three main categories: definite frequencies (always, never), indefinite frequencies (usually, often), and partial frequencies (sometimes, vaguely). It’s important to note that these words go in different positions depending on the type of sentence:

    Definite frequency adverbs go in front of the main verb or after the auxiliary verb: He always studies hard for his exams. / Does he always study hard for his exams?
    Indefinite frequency adverbs usually go in mid-position: She often writes letters to her grandparents.
    Partial frequency adverbs can go in different positions, but most often they’re found at the end of the sentence: They sometimes go out for dinner on Fridays. / Do they sometimes go out for dinner on Fridays?

    The difference between an adjective and an adverb

    An adjective is a word that describes a noun or pronoun, while an adverb is a word that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. In the sentence “He is taller than me,” the word “taller” is an adjective comparing the heights of two people, while the word “than” is an adverb indicating the degree of difference.

    How to use adjectives and adverbs in a sentence

    There are a few things to keep in mind when using adjectives and adverbs in a sentence. First, adjectives describe, identify and quantify people or things and usually go in front of a noun. They don’t change if the noun is plural. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs and usually come after the verb. For example:
    He is taller than me. CORRECT THE SENTENCE

    In this sentence, “taller” is the adjective that is describing the subject, “He”. “Than” is the adverb that is modifying the adjective “taller”.

    Examples of adjectives and adverbs

    There are a few different ways to make comparisons with adjectives and adverbs. For example, we can use “taller” to compare two people’s heights, or we can use “more quickly” to compare how fast two people are running.

    Here are some more examples of comparisons you can make with adjectives and adverbs:

    Adjectives:
    * My car is bigger than yours.
    * Her house is nicer than ours.
    * His grades are better than mine.

    Adverbs:
    * I drive more slowly than her.
    * She works more efficiently than him.
    * They party harder than us!

    When to use adjectives and adverbs

    When writing, it is important to use adjectives and adverbs correctly in order to communicate your message clearly. Adjectives describe, identify and quantify people or things and usually go in front of a noun. They don’t change if the noun is plural. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs and usually come after the verb. For example:
    He is taller than me. CORRECT
    The sentence above is correct because “taller” is an adjective that describes the boy, and “than” is an adverb that modifies the adjective.

    There is no need to correct the sentence, “He is taller than me.” This is a common error that many people make, but it is perfectly acceptable in both spoken and written English.

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